Going into the office can be tough — we get it. No matter how much you do (or don’t) love your job, spending 40 hours per week in an uninspiring space of fluorescent bulbs and blank walls is bound to leave anyone daydreaming for better design.

Take a look at these companies who have reinvented what we think of as the corporate office. They’ve collectively cut out the cubicle, embraced the employee kitchen, and upgraded to much more comfortable seating. In other words, where do we apply?

Creative Offices We Wish We Worked In:

Airbnb | San Francisco

Airbnb is known for connecting people all over the world with unique places while traveling, and they wanted to bring this theme into their new San Francisco offices. Every part of the 72,031 square foot office makes a nod to different styles of homes from around the world. The coolest part? The modern top floor atrium is a kitchen/dining hall/multi-purpose space where a dinner bell signals the start of local, organic family-style means for the entire company.

Design: Gensler  Photography: Jasper Sanidad

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Yelp | Chicago

Overlooking the Chicago River in a hip and vibrant neighborhood, the user-review company has taken up shop in an iconic warehouse, recently renovated to house several tech and startup companies. Yelp’s office embraces the building’s industrial character by leaving ceilings, mechanical systems, and support beams unfinished. The urban aesthetic twists in with bold wood, modern office furniture and accents of Yelp’s signature red.

Design: Valerio Dewalt Train Associates  Photography: Tom Harris, Hedrich Blessing Photographyyelp-creative-offices- yelp-creative-offices

Refinery29 | NYC

Refinery29 is a women’s fashion and beauty website that is known for its meticulously curated style and design. Their 25,000 square foot office in Lower Manhattan embraces this ideal perfectly. Perched in an Art Deco building overlooking the river, the aesthetic of Refinery29’s collaborative space is whimsical, chic, and full of punches of bright color. There are several cool nooks and crannies in this office, but one feature that stands out across the board: the furniture is fantastic.

Design: Chad McPhail Design  Photography: Ingalls Photography

TripAdvisor | Needham

When online travel guru TripAdvisor built their new headquarters just outside of Boston, Massachusetts, they wanted their 282,000 square foot space to feel as imaginative as possible. Embracing their passion for travel, each floor represents a different continent and its culture. A thousand user photos create a global mural in the reception area. The show stopper, however, is a four-story atrium which includes their version of Rome’s Spanish Steps and a three-story vertical garden under a electronic sky.

Design: Baker Design Group  Photography: Robert Benson Photography

HomeAway | Austin

Vacation home rental company HomeAway has over 20 creative offices globally, all seeking to make employees feel like they’re anywhere in the world but work. Their Austin office is no exception, as an 114,665 square foot space for employees to hang out all day. Or, work. The birdhouse-themed office provides seemingly endless community space for employees to collaborate and create. There’s also a 3D video tunnel for “virtual vacation experiences”. We’re not sure what that means but it certainly can’t be a bad thing.

Design: Lauck Group  Photography: Nick Simonite

Dropbox | NYC

Dropbox has become the authority in cloud storage. Their NYC office is a visual representation of their dominant, streamlined service. This office occupies a single story in a historic building in the Flatiron District and embraces the building’s character by keeping its brick walls, industrial ceilings, and wood flooring. Most of the furniture and decor in the 11,000 square foot space are black and metal, though the open floor plan keeps the color palette from dampening the bright space. In fact, the entire office is open, save for a few phone and conference rooms — and even those have glass fronts.

Design: STUDIOS  Photography: Bilyana Dimitrova

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