Large or small, a children room with a well-thought-out design will be a place where your child will love to spend time.

Children grow up fast, and it’s not long before the nursery cot and changing table have to make way for a proper bed and more grown-up furniture. By school age they will have firm ideas about what they like around them. It’s easy to get caught up in planning how the room will look but, whatever the age of the child, safety is paramount so always be aware of electrical sockets, trailing cables, switches, light fittings, radiators, window locks and cords for blinds.

Style finder

Wallpaper is an easy way to pick up on a favourite theme, though striking patterns are often best limited to a feature wall rather than used overall. It’s a good idea to opt for paint or wallpaper that has a wipe-clean or scrubbable finish. For young children it’s fun to create a theme, such as a circus tent or pirate ship, using fabric and paint, and they can help you.

Make up a roller or Roman blind to match and search out bedlinen, lampshades and cushions that fit the theme. As with adult rooms, it’s more flexible to have neutral walls and update them with accessories.

Children room: how to plan a well-designed bedroom

Room to grow

Depending on the size of the room, the options for positioning furniture may be limited. As well as creating enough storage for clothes and toys, you’ll probably want to find space for a desk or table and have enough floor area for your child to play. Child-sized furniture does look sweet but is quickly outgrown. Modular furniture is a good solution because it’s flexible enough to make the most of the space and can be added to or rearranged as your child grows.

When choosing furniture, strength and durability are important as is attention to detail – the rounded edges and corners of Nubie’s Oeuf NYC furniture is a good example. If you’re short on floor space, mid or high sleepers for older children provide masses of storage beneath the bed, with drawers for toys or clothes, or even a desk arrangement. Bear in mind that they do make an imposing statement in a room and take up quite a bit of floor and wall space. Most fun of all are hideaway beds with doors that close to create a den, or a bed with a trundle for sleepovers. For storage, a furniture system with a mix of shelves and cupboards is ideal.

Divided spaces

In a shared room, creating separate areas – however limited in size – for each child will help to prevent arguments. One way of doing this is by defining the space in different colours. Or you could divide off areas with a curtain or even shelving, which must be firmly fixed in place.

Bunk beds aren’t suitable for small children, but some designs can be used as single beds, then later stacked.

ROOMS FOR TEENS

* Plan the space with your teenager and create zones for lounging, study and sleep. Their choice of colour and design is likely to differ from yours so be prepared to negotiate! Use tester paint pots to try out colours

* Must-have furnishings may not be favour of the month for long. Keep the budget low with high street cushions and furnishings and easy-change options such as wall stickers

* Soak up noise with fitted carpet and hang thick, interlined curtains. Add soft seating such as beanbags or cubes so they can spend time there with friends

* Turn a corner of the room into a study space, with a well-lit desk, plenty of sockets, a pinboard and hooks for headphones and other essentials

From: House Beautiful magazine

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